Redbanded Stink Bug Identification

Matthew E. Baur, Baldwin, Jack L.  |  8/16/2005 11:47:06 PM

The third through the fifth instars are 4-8 mm long, mostly green with red and black markings along the side and top of the abdomen (Figure 1).

Adults are 10-12 mm and brilliant green, but as they get older, they may appear more yellow. Adults normally have two stripes across the back of the thorax, one yellow and one dark red to purple or even black (Figure 2).

The redbanded stink bug has five instars, the first of which is never seen because it resides in the egg. The second instar is up to 3 mm in length and mostly red and indistinguishable from most other early instar stink bug nymphs. The third through the fifth instars are 4-8 mm long, mostly green with red and black markings along the side and top of the abdomen (Figure 1).
 
Adults are 10-12 mm and brilliant green, but as they get older, they may appear more yellow. Adults normally have two stripes across the back of the thorax, one yellow and one dark red to purple or even black (Figure 2). This stink bug is much smaller than either southern green or green stink bugs, but is about the same size as Thyanta species. Adult Piezodorus guildinii can be separated from Thyanta species based on a spine extending from the second abdominal segment between the attachment of the hind legs to the body (a similar characteristic is used to separate southern green and green stink bugs).
 
Piezodorus guildinii egg masses are easy to separate from southern green stink bug and brown stink bug egg masses because female Piezodorus guildinii always lay eggs in two rows of 10-15 eggs per egg mass. Southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula) eggs masses are almost always laid in rows forming a hexagon, and brown stink bug (Euschistus species) egg masses are disorganized.
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