April 13, 2011- Rice stand observations at Acadia Parish RWW demo site

5/26/2011 11:44:33 PM

Picture 1: Anna Meszaros and Barrett Courville taking stand data in Acadia Parish.

Picture 2: Rice grown from CruiserMaxx-treated seed to the right and Dermacor X-100 treated seed to the left.

Picture 3: Rice plants grown from CruiserMaxx-treated seed to the right and untreated seed to the left.

Picture 5: Rice grown from NipsitInside-treated seed to the right and CruiserMaxx-treated seed to the left.

Picture 6: Rice grown from seed treated with NipsitInside to the right and untreated seed to the left.

Picture 7: Rice grown from untreated seed to the right and Dermacor X-100-treated seed to the left.

Picture 4: Rice grown from Dermacor X-100-treated seed to the right and NipsitInside-treated seed to the left.

Picture 8: Rice water weevil adult scarring injury on an untreated plant.

Rice stand observations at Acadia Parish RWW demo site

 Originally posted April 13, 2011, by Natalie Hummel on Louisiana Rice Insects

Today Anna Meszaros and I met with County Agent Barrett Courville and crop consultant Rustin Gilder at the Acadia Parish demo site, which is farmed by Glen and Wes Simon. We were pleased to find a healthy, rigorous stand of rice. Much of the field is already at tillering stage just two weeks after seedling emergence! This location was planted with XL745 at #22 seeding rate.

We used the same method as last year – counting the number of plants and taking plant heights on ten randomly selected plants at five random locations in each strip (Picture 1).

We did not notice any obvious visual differences between seed treatments (at this location we are comparing CruiserMaxx, Dermacor X-100, NipsitInside to an untreated check). The following series of pictures includes every possible side-by-side comparison of treatments (Pictures 2-7).

It was not difficult to find rice water weevil adult scarring (Picture 8) in the field. We did not observe any rice water weevils. The field had recently received a flush. It was difficult to assess a difference in the severity of scarring between treatments, but our sense was that it was a little more prevalent in the untreated strips.

We will continue to monitor this field for any other insect problems that might occur. The next step will be to take rice water weevil core samples four weeks after permanent flood.

It sure is dry out there – we could use some good rain. In these dry conditions it is important to remember to actively scout for chinch bugs – they tend to thrive in these dry conditions, especially if weeds or pasture near a rice field start to dehydrate.

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