Flood August 2016

Linda Benedict  |  8/26/2016 4:27:03 PM

These photos are from the catastrophic flooding that occurred in south Louisiana in August 2016. Please feel free to download, but please give credit to LSU AgCenter Communications. If you right click and "save as," you should get a photo with high resolution (except for a few). Please let us know if you have any problems. Linda Benedict

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South of Crowley lodged rice that has not been harvested and mostly under water. Photo provided by Dustin Harrell

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Rice covered in flood water. Photo provided by Dustin Harrell

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Horses stranded in water near Crowley. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Between Lafayette and Maurice on Aug. 14. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Grain sorghum kernels have begun to sprout because of the recent heavy rains in Louisiana. Sprouting grain sorghum will lead to lower test weights and reduced yields costing farmers income. Louisiana had harvested about 65 percent of the state’s grain sorghum before the rains hit, but there still remains about 17,000 acres to harvest. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Flooded grain bins east of Crowley. Many farmers will be faced with emptying wet grain from their bins, as well as dealing with flooded homes. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Damaged cotton. This is boll rot. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Sprouted corn. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Downed rice near Port Barre has sprouted before farmer Samuel Buller could harvest this 48-acre field. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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A corral covered with floodwaters on the Girouard Ranch near Lafayette. Most ranchers were able to get their cattle to high ground. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Farmer Richard Duhon, of Maurice, walks through a field of dead soybean plants. The field was submerged with knee-deep water for several days, and LSU AgCenter soybean specialist Ron Levy said the plants cannot survive without air that provides oxygen. The fields are near Indian Bayou in Lafayette Parish. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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A sugarcane plant has started growing roots on the nodes that were submerged for several days in a field near Arnaudville, Louisiana. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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A soybean field at the St. Landry-Evangeline Parish line on Hwy. 29. Photo provided by Dustin Harrell

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Flooded soybean field. Photo provided by Dustin Harrell

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Between Maurice and Lafayette on Aug. 14 near The Glade subdivision. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Between Lafayette and Maurice on Aug. 14. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Corn kernels show signs of sprouting because of the recent flooding rains. For the most part, the kernels are protected by the shucks, but kernels on the end are more likely to sprout because of their exposure to the rain and sun. About 30 percent of the state’s corn acreage has been harvested with about 380,000 remaining. Early LSU AgCenter crop damage estimates have corn losses at nearly $11 million. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Swimming dairy cows. Photo provided by Hubert Yarbrough, Tickfaw dairy farmer

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Damaged cotton. This is sprouted cotton. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Damaged cotton. This is target spot on leaves. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Sprouted corn. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Farmer Samuel Buller holds a rice plant with rice that had sprouted after the 48-acre field had fallen over into floodwater. Buller said the rice fell over because the panicles were loaded with a good crop, but he was able to harvest a few other fields between rains. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Flooding has damaged commercial beehives throughout south Louisiana, including these on pastureland near Lafayette. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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A flooded soybean field on the Charlie Fontenot farm near Palmetto, Louisiana. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Sugarcane farmer Justin Frederick, left, and Stuart Gauthier, LSU AgCenter county agent in St. Martin Parish, examine a sugarcane stalk that had been flooded with 2 feet of water in a field near Arnaudville, Louisiana. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Rice field. Photo provided by Dustin Harrell

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Sprouted rice. Photo by Ken Lyon near Roberts Cove in Acadia Parish. If rice has sprouted in the field, it needs to be harvested as soon as possible and sent to the drier. Typically, this rice will be discounted for water damage and stain.

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Between Maurice and Lafayette on Aug. 14 near The Glade subdivision. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Flooded corn field. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Flooded grain sorghum. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Cattle owned by Sammy Broussard near Cypress Island, Louisiana, graze on grass flooded by a foot of water before being loaded onto a trailer for relocation to higher ground. Photo by Stan Dutile

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Damaged cotton. This is target spot on a square. Photo by Dan Fromme

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Downed rice near Port Barre has sprouted before farmer Samuel Buller could harvest this 48-acre field. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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A line of ruined hay bales on the Girouard Ranch near Lafayette. Flooding has decimated hay and pastureland across south Louisiana, and efforts are underway through the Louisiana Farm Bureau Federation to provide hay for livestock. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Flooding has damaged commercial beehives throughout south Louisiana, including these on pastureland near Lafayette. Photo by Bruce Schultz

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Stan Dutile, extension agent, left, Ron Levy, extension soybean specialist, center, and farmer Richard Duhon, of Maurice, examine soybeans in one of Duhon's fields, which is near Indian Bayou in Lafayette Parish.

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