Faculty

Lane Foil  |  7/27/2012 1:50:36 AM

Dr. Lane Foil-Appointed Faculty

Lane Foil

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute Research on vector-borne diseases and the direct impact of arthropods on animal health. Specific projects that would be relevant: 1) Describing the vectors of EHDV and BTV within different habitats. 2) Development of a vaccine that will provide protection for deer against exposure to EHDV through the natural vector. 3) Describing the mechanisms of transmission of the agents of chronic wasting disease. 4) Developing a fire ant management program aimed at protection of nesting game birds.

Dr. Glen Gentry-Appointed Faculty

Dr. Glen Gentry

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute: My research program is focused on improving assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to increase reproductive efficiency in relevant agricultural and animal model species. The two major thrusts of my research include development of strategies to improve pregnancy rates following artificial insemination (AI) and to increase the survivability of embryos following cryopreservation. Artificial insemination is an ART that has not been readily adopted as a standard management practice by the United States beef producer. Reasons given include a lack of repeatability resulting in variable outcomes and perceived input and labor costs that are thought to be cost prohibitive. Similarly, cryopreservation of embryos has not achieved the same level of acceptance as the cryopreservation of sperm, and thus the availability of superior female genetic material is limited in some species. Therefore my laboratory is focused on increasing the efficiency of these ARTs to address these issues. The control of the follicular wave prior to fixed-timed AI is paramount in achieving high pregnancy rates. If successful, the need for estradiol in bovine estrous synchronization would be greatly reduced and pregnancy rates from fixed-timed AI would be positively impacted. We have successfully developed estrous synchronization protocols for fixed-timed AI in captive white-tailed deer. High-fence operations (offering hunts for sale) have increased in the southern region and this type of operation requires breeding does and bucks to be managed using conventional animal husbandry practices. Further research into the reproductive efficiency of laparoscopic insemination of white-tailed deer is needed and findings from this work may also be applicable to endangered animal species.

Dr. Philip Elzer-Adjunct Faculty

Dr. Philip Elzer

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute Research on animal infectious diseases with an emphasis on prevention through diagnostics and vaccinology Specific projects that would be relevant: Current projects involve investigating the potential of multivalent vaccines for brucellosis, tuberculosis, Johne’s disease, and pseudorabies and using small ruminant models for infectious diseases, including transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (Chronic Wasting Disease, Scrapie and Mad Cow Disease). A subunit brucellosis vaccine for potential use in elk and bison is being tested in the caprine model, and a non-select agent brucellosis challenge model is being characterized. Red deer could be used as a model for elk. Vaccine studies for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease and Bluetongue Virus in white-tail deer are underway.

Dr. Fred Enright-Emeritus

Dr. Fred Enright

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute:

Research on causes and pathology of infectious diseases in domestic and wild animals

Specific projects that would be relevant:

1) Vaccine development for bacterial diseases in ruminants and wildlife

2) Pathology of infectious diseases of ruminants and wildlife

3) Novel therapeutic methods for combating diseases and cancer

Dr. Claudia Husseneder-Adjunct Faculty

Dr. Claudia Husseneder

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute Molecular biology, population genetics, breeding structure of deer, game birds and associated insect vectors, metagenomics, culture and manipulation of microbiota associated with game animal nutrition and health. Specific projects that would be relevant: 1. Investigate the gene flow among orbivirus vector populations to test if certain species associated with livestock have restricted geographic ranges related to specific larval habitats. 2. Study the genetic structure of deer populations that are highly susceptible or innately immune to disease associated with orbiviruses. 3. Measure the genetic diversity of game bird populations to establish whether there were genetic bottlenecks in areas of high and low density of red imported fire ants.

Dr. Donald P. Reed-Emeritus

Dr. Donald Reed

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute:

Extension Programming to help disseminate information gaining through research efforts of the staff at the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute.

Dr. Felix D. Guerrero-Adjunct Faculty

Dr. Felix D. Guerrero

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute Research on vector-borne diseases and the development of vaccines to control the arthropods that transmit the disease-causing pathogens. Specific projects that would be relevant: 1) Describing the immune response of whitetail deer following vaccination with candidate anti-tick vaccines. 2) Development of a vaccine that will provide protection for deer against exposure to ticks.

Dr. Dearl E. Sanders-Emeritus

Sanders CV

Area of interest relative to the mission of the Bob R. Jones Wildlife Institute

Research coordinator for wildlife studies at the Bob R. Jones-Idlewild Research Station.

Specific projects that would be relevant:

1). Facilitating EHDV in deer and aiding in the development for an EHDV vaccine.

2). Providing appropriate whitetail and red deer for animal science reproductive studies.

3). Maintain captive and wild populations of whitetail deer and captive populations of red deer.

4). Promote research on population dynamics of upland game birds.

5). Manage wild deer, upland game birds and other species for wildlife studies on the research station.

Jacques Fuselier, DVM-Adjunct Faculty

Jonathan Roberts, DVM-Adjunct Faculty

Rate This Article:

Have a question or comment about the information on this page?

Innovate . Educate . Improve Lives

The LSU AgCenter and the LSU College of Agriculture

Top