Children Can Learn At Home How To Succeed In School

Janet Fox  |  7/22/2006 1:22:30 AM

2006 Back-to-School News

It’s never too late to help your child succeed in school. Developing success skills occurs at home as well as in the classroom, according to LSU AgCenter 4-H youth expert Janet Fox.

"Parents should be involved with their children’s education," Fox says, adding, "They can do a lot to help them do well in school."

The youth expert advises asking children questions about what they are learning and doing at school. Encourage them to give detailed answers, which might be difficult for them at first, but it can be done.

Look at books, magazines and newspapers with your children to help keep them up to date on world events or areas of interest. Discuss current events to help them form values and develop problem-solving skills.

"Television and the computer are great places to learn," Fox says, but cautions parents to monitor what the children view and to put a limit on viewing time.

When in comes to studying, children must have a quiet place to do their homework or projects. It’s best if this place is out of the way and free from distractions. Make sure paper, pencils, scissors, a stapler and markers are available.

In addition to being involved with your child’s education, it’s important to form relationships with key teachers and administrators. Make any of your child’s special needs known immediately.

Share information with teachers so that both parties know what is happening at home and school. Changes in behavior or routine are the usual types of information that should be shared.

For instance, if your child is taking a new medication or you are going away on a business trip, let the teacher know. What might seem trivial to you could be key to understanding why your child is acting out of character.

"Finally, parents should expect success from their children," Fox says, explaining, "It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. You expect good, and good happens."

Praise your child for hard work and a job well done. Working as partners, parents help their children learn, gain self-confidence and success in school.

For information on related youth topics, visit the AgCenter Web site at www.lsuagcenter.com. For local information and educational programs, contact an extension agent in your parish LSU AgCenter office.

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On the Internet: LSU AgCenter: www.lsuagcenter.com/
On the Internet: Louisiana 4-H Web site: www.louisiana4h.org

Source: Janet Fox (225) 578-6751, or Jfox@agcenter.lsu.edu

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